Advice introducing a puppy to our older dog.
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    Junior Member JoeyCain's Avatar
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    Advice introducing a puppy to our older dog.

    We are excited about getting ready to introduce our puppy to our home. Currently, we have an 8 year old bulldog already at home, he's well balanced and socialized. I had a couple of questions I was hoping to get some guidance on from my new friend here.

    1. How should we physically introduce the puppy to my older dog? My dog will be in the living room when I will walk through the door. Is it okay to let the puppy follow me and walk in after me or do I need to let him smell the rear of the puppy?

    2. Should we play with the puppy outside the play-pen where the older dog will be as well? Or is it a better idea to keep the puppy in there for the first week or so?

    Thank you kindly for any advice you may be able to share

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    Senior Member Bill's Avatar
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    Between a dog and puppy meeting for the first time, there is rarely a problem. I wouldn't worry about it. The dog will rush up to the puppy. They will go through the normal greeting behaviors then run off to play. It would probably be easier if this is done off leash outside like in a fenced in back yard if you have one.

    ETA: The less you intefere or try to control actions the better things will be.
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    Bill

    http://www.skylarzack.com/rawfeeding.htm

    Dogs are our link to paradise. They don't know evil or jealousy or discontent. To sit with a dog on a hillside on a glorious afternoon is to be back in Eden, where doing nothing was not boring-it was peace. - Milan Kundera

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    Junior Member JoeyCain's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice, this sounds reassuring - I'm a bit nervous but I'll give it a shot as you suggested. Anything I can do to warm my older dog to the puppy before hand or should I just let them get to know each other right off the bat?

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    Senior Member Bill's Avatar
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    I was super nervious when I introduced my Thor (then 12 weeks) to Abby (then 5yo). Both are Great Danes and Abby is dog aggressive. The reason I got a puppy instead of another adult dog is that I knew it would be a problem for Abby and hoped she wouldn't feed threatened by a puppy and I was right. She ran up to him full speed as I held my breath. She slid to a stop, started butt sniffing and all proceeded nicely after that. Thor is 6 years old now and Abby is 11. They have had maybe 2 or 3 "squabbles" their whole life.
    Bill

    http://www.skylarzack.com/rawfeeding.htm

    Dogs are our link to paradise. They don't know evil or jealousy or discontent. To sit with a dog on a hillside on a glorious afternoon is to be back in Eden, where doing nothing was not boring-it was peace. - Milan Kundera

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    Junior Member JoeyCain's Avatar
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    That's a great success story Must have been quite the sight seeing a great dane puppy running full steam ahead to Abby!

    Thanks for the advice Bill - you have been a great help to us already! I'm really loving this new community

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    My mother uses much the same technique as Bill described. She lets the dogs meet in the (fenced) garden first. That gives them a chance to get all the excitement out of their system. As Bill said it doesn't take long for them to settle down. It takes a bit longer to introduce an older dog, but it can usually be done without too much trouble.




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    Senior Member Orrymain's Avatar
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    Some people say you should introduce them at a neutral location, but for decades, I just bring the new dog (puppy or not) in and say, "hey, we have another baby". I hold on to the puppy or keep the new dog close just to be sure, but honestly, I've never had anything but complete success. I think it's because they all know I love them. There is no competition here. I actually may give my 'old' dog extra attention. I don't let our routine get interrupted or anything. All of the dogs have bonded very quickly. I did have a 3rd dog once who adopted me at work (true story) that I brought home. He was accepted by the two older dogs, females, and they played and stuff, but he liked to stay inside with me so he was like my shadow a lot. Still, there were never problems. All the dogs played, loved, and slept together. Do it love. Pay attention to the older dogs a tad more for a while, and all should be well.

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    Orrymain I have a relative who has four little dogs, she has a very similar attitude to introducung a new dog and it seems to work well for her. She has a couple of cats too and I am always surprised how easily she manages to integrate a new dog.




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    I have a two month old puppy and a 3 year old dog.

    My 3 year old is not necessarily aggressive. Allow me to explain... He barks a lot and snaps at people but does not bite unless he feel threatened. When people he is not familiar with come over he will bark and go crazy but not attack until he sniffs them and eventually allows them to pet him. He has bitten me before and at the veterinarian he needs a muzzle. Now with my new puppy I've tried several times to at least have them under the same roof but my older dog will start barking, growling and charging at the pup. I haven't really given him the chance to sniff the puppy because I'm far too scared of the dog biting him. I don't know what to do. I really want them to get along first because I love them both so much and second of all because if they don't get along my mother says I would have to sell or give the puppy to a shelter. Please help! Thank you.

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    I found a lot of good articles and manuals on the subject I never tried
    I hope that this article will help

    Taking on a brand-new puppy can be among the most exhilarating things that could come about to an individual or a family, but that precious little fur ball can as well cause a great deal of tension, particularly during the 1st couple of days of coming to his new household. If you've just took in a pup, there are some things you want to bear in mind to make certain that this novel add-on to your family grows up fit, happy and healthy. Below are 6 dog training tips you ought to know for the benefit of the newly-arrived puppy:

    1. Provide your brand-new puppy with a great deal of love and care, in particular when he does something "justly," especially after you start training your dog. When you begin training a puppy it is very important to communicate with him the instant you take him home. Do not await for your puppy to make a mistake or do something inappropriate prior to beginning communicating with him. Whenever you begin communicating with your puppy this way, you're fundamentally conditioning your puppy that you're good some of the times and not nice at different times.

    2. Puppies love chewing therefore give your puppy a great deal of chew toys. You can make chew toys for your puppy or you can buy some from your local pet store. This manner your puppy understands early on to chew on his toys rather than your shoes!

    3. Have comfy, warm bed for your puppy. If you expect for your puppy to live outdoors, make certain to provide him with weatherproof doghouse. The doghouse ought to be roomy too. If you resolve to allow your puppy sleep indoors, you'll be able to use a rectangular wooden box for his bed. You can also check out crates and kennels sold at local pet shops.

    4. Observe your puppy when small kids are present. Puppies are practically no match for rambunctious little children. Puppies can easily become injured and even killed if they are left alone with youngsters. Small kids commonly do not understand that puppies are very delicate creatures and that they should be managed with additional care and gentleness.

    5. Start your puppy on a steady feeding agenda the 1st day it comes in your home. If your puppy is six months old or younger, give him 3 to 4 solid meals daily. During each feeding, give your brand-new pup all the food he can eat within half-hour. After 30 minutes, remove any leftovers. It's really important that you allow for your puppy plenitude of fresh drinking water in between meals.

    6. Begin training your puppy to go on steady bathroom breaks. Take your puppy to the same bathroom spot at the same times day-after-day, whenever at all possible. It's advocated that you take your puppy on bathroom breaks after every meal and two to three hours in between his meals, and after he's taken a nap. At nighttime, take your new puppy on late-night bathroom trips if possible. This will educate your puppy early on to go to his bathroom spot whenever he requires to urinate in the midst of the night rather than doing it right in his crate

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