Buddys "mouthing" is getting no better
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Thread: Buddys "mouthing" is getting no better

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    Buddys "mouthing" is getting no better

    HI, we have now had Buddy for 6 weeks, we got him when he was just under 7 weeks old,which was probably too soon for him to be taken from his mum and
    pther pups as he is getting no better , his mouth is continuously mouthing at fresh air, we have tried replacing our arms and hands with a toy.Have a command to
    stop him when he does this, have walked away but he is still jumping up and almost snapping now, and it hurts.Dont want him to turn out snappy, so please any advice,otherwise he is lovely, but need to see light at end of the tunnel.Is this anything to worry about, or normal. He is starting puppy class in 10 days, but it seems a long way off! Do we give him a treat when we are successful in getting him away from our skin?! help!

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    Senior Member Bill's Avatar
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    Continue removing yourself from his mouth, walk away and ignore him for a few minutes. Don't say anything. Don't look at him. He doesn't exist. DON'T give him a toy as a replacement. That is rewarding him for mouthing. Don't "Command" him to stop. Don't say anything to him. Once he figures out what he's doing to get ignored, he'll stop. Remember he is only 12 or 13 weeks old. He is still a baby. This won't last forever.
    Bill

    http://www.skylarzack.com/rawfeeding.htm

    Dogs are our link to paradise. They don't know evil or jealousy or discontent. To sit with a dog on a hillside on a glorious afternoon is to be back in Eden, where doing nothing was not boring-it was peace. - Milan Kundera

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    Senior Member Stephanie's Avatar
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    I have read in a few placces that you should 'yelp' [like a high pitched ow] when the pup bites and nips at you and then get up and walk away from the pup. The idea behind this is that when puppies play together and they bite too hard, the injured pup will 'yelp' to let the other know that this is not accpetable. Would be interested to know what Bill thinks of this concept?

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    Do you know, last night Buddy was being very hyper and jabbed at my hands,it had been going on for a while, with me moving away and ignoring him, then after one quite

    quite painful nip I pretended to properly cry, Buddy stopped in his tracks, looked up at me and began crying himself! It was so touching....I have been yelping and it does work but because I really must have sounded upset,( I was really letting off steam to myself!) it seemed to get right through to Buddy, he came right over and made friends,seemed
    keen to stop me crying!

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    Senior Member Bill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie View Post
    I have read in a few placces that you should 'yelp' [like a high pitched ow] when the pup bites and nips at you and then get up and walk away from the pup. The idea behind this is that when puppies play together and they bite too hard, the injured pup will 'yelp' to let the other know that this is not accpetable. Would be interested to know what Bill thinks of this concept?
    I prefer not to make too big a deal of of it in the pup's eyes. If you silently walk away, the pup will look at you and try to decide what he did to cause you to walk away. Once he makes the connection between the nip and you walking away, he will stop nipping. Another reason I prefer not to yelp is that dogs have 2 sides to their brain just like humans. The emotional side and the logical side. Unlike humans, they can only think with one side at a time. When you yelp you are engaging the emotional side of his brain and he learns much better and faster with the logical side. You want the logical side to know not to nip. I'm sure I didn't express that very well but hopefully you'll understand.
    Bill

    http://www.skylarzack.com/rawfeeding.htm

    Dogs are our link to paradise. They don't know evil or jealousy or discontent. To sit with a dog on a hillside on a glorious afternoon is to be back in Eden, where doing nothing was not boring-it was peace. - Milan Kundera

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    Senior Member Stephanie's Avatar
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    Yes, I understand what you are saying, thanks Bill, that is a most interesting explanation.

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    Thank you Bill that was a very interesting explanation, it makes a lot of sense.




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    Senior Member Orrymain's Avatar
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    This is a good lesson in not separating pups from their moms too early. I guess sometimes it's necessary, but they really need that time together. Your pup sounds adorable. I hope he figures it out soon!

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    Red face Mouthing

    A word of encouragement to anyone with a pup with mouthing problems! at 18 weeks...Bud has learned to SOFT MOUTH!! Thank goodness.. dont despair anyone, I really thought it would never happen.. bless him, I can sit and have a cuddle at last, RED LETTER DAY, YIPPEE, Thanks to everyone for advice. AND THE SUN IS SHINING,

  12. #10
    Senior Member Stephanie's Avatar
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    WOOT WOOT - great to read some good news, thanks for the update, glad to know the hard work and patience is paying off, and yes it is HOT HOT HOT today!

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